News

Volume 33 no 2 November / December 2018

Features: 6 Bearing witness, not weapons Jill Gibbon interviewed by Daniel Nanavati 11 glenstone penitentiary Nancy Schreiber 15 van gogh in arles Jane Addams Allen, 1986, the marketing of the Metropolitan 20. All consuming beauty Rosanna Hildyard on John Berger and Naomi Wolf 27 white supremacy, benevolent institutions and shinola Rebekah Modrak 35. Dressing for that final journey Pendery Weekes, …

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Writers Groups – Cornwall

It may look like a tranquil group of women ready to take on a sewing project for the autumn, but instead it was the New Art Examiner’s monthly writing meeting held in Penzance. Though only 8 this time, writers came from Cornwall, the Seychelles and the US. Topics included land art/environmental art, Ayn Rand, the Lost Library Book, Robert Borlase …

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Dressing for that Final Journey

Have you ever wondered what you would wear on your last final journey? Though this is fashion at the extreme end, for this important moment nothing should be left out, nor any detail overlooked. Prepare your outfit or others will do it for you, perhaps leaving you slightly unsatisfied, to say the least. As the old joke goes, “Is he …

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Dancing with Myself – The Artists Represent Themselves

Flowers made of salt, very fragile compact masses that emerge from the walls of the warehouses of Punta della Dogana in Venice, centuries-old witnesses of the salt trade that took place here, welcome the visitor to the exhibition of Dancing with Myself. There could be no better identity card to introduce a collective that on the presence/absence of the body …

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Why Cornwall Sold Out

Being asked to write an article on such a topic is rather like asking a man if he has stopped beating his wife. Cornwall. We have to go back a little. Perhaps as far as the Vikings with whom we were on friendly terms, often fighting on the same side. Jolly Vikings. To the Romans who didn’t quite get here, …

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Black is flat at Roots and Culture

Gonzalo Reyes Rodriguez and Darryl DeAngelo Terrell’s two person show, currently open at Roots and Culture brings together the work of two very different artists. Terrell’s text pieces act as a striking foil to Rodriguez’s photographic works which explore the legacy of documentary photography drawn from the legacy of the Sandanista National Liberation Front and declassified School of the America’s …

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Huong Ngo, Reap the Whirlwind at Aspect Ratio (West town)

How are representations of the female body visualized and introduced to the western gaze in colonized southeast Asia? How do these representations sustain the programmes of colonization? How do these representations grant or deny subjectivity to subject of the gaze? And perhaps most importantly, how do we reconsider these women as subjects seeking political agency rather than remain as flattened …

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Entrepreneurship 407: White Supremacy, Benevolent Institutions, and Shinola

There was great clarity in the post-Civil War Confederate monument. Solid materials erected in a city’s central square to carry an unambiguous message: honor white supremacy and intimidate African Americans. While we celebrate the removal of these granite and bronze statues from plazas around the country, it’s worth considering whether their messages find new, unsettling, and implicit forms in places …

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Marking the Infinite:

Contemporary Women Artists from Aboriginal Australia   The Phillips Collection: Marking the Infinite, spotlights nine leading Aboriginal Australian women artists: Nonggirrnga Marawili, Wintjiya Napaltjarri, Yukultji Napangati, Angelina Pwerle, Lena Yarinkura, Gulumbu Yunupingu, Nyapanyapa Yunupingu, Carlene West, and Regina Pilawuk Wilson. The artists are from remote Aboriginal communities across Australia, and the subjects of their art are broad, yet each work …

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The Swamp School

One quarter of Lithuania’s territory consists of swamps and wetlands. These lands represent the ethno-cultural identity of the various regions, and pedagogues have long stressed the relationship between ethnic culture and ecology. It is common in ancient myths to consider water a sacred element for positive spiritual activity, but with potential for evil. In local folklore the devil lives in …

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