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In Memoriam – John Link in Art Teaching

We republish this interview of our friend and colleague John Link, who died on May 1st 2021.   John Link, retired Professor of Art, Western Michigan University, painter, and contributor to the New Art Examiner, Interview with Lily Lihting Li Kostrzewa – From Philosophy to Art to Writing: When I was in philosophy, my fellow grad students agreed that we …

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Cleveland, Ohio, and the American Industrial Artland

Darren Jones Cleveland could trademark the metallic gray of its winter skies when the cloud deck merges with phreatic plumes from the fissures of growling steel mills. Such scenes exemplify what remains an extraordinary juncture of nature and human engineering in this city, despite the ravages of the rust belt’s decline. When December casts its pall over Cleveland’s indomitable skyline, …

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State of Art: Visual Arts Prosper in Ohio Cities Despite Conservative Political Climate

Steven Litt CLEVELAND, Ohio — Viewed from a distance, the State of Ohio might seem hostile territory for the visual arts, or fine arts of any kind. It’s a blood red conservative state where voters twice picked anti-cultural Donald Trump for president by an eight percent margin, and put in place a Republican-dominated legislature with a deep antipathy to cities, …

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Cultural Progress and the Aesthetics of the Black Experience: Amanda D. King in Conversation With Darren Jones

Amanda D. King is a creative strategist, artist, and activist pursuing justice and equity and envisioning possibilities for social transformation through arts and culture. Amanda serves as Creative Director and co-founder of Shooting Without Bullets – a nonprofit creative and social enterprise using cultural production and creative strategies to advance social movement for Black and Brown youth, artists, and communities. …

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Karl Wirsum, A True Legend of the Chicago Art World, Dies at the age of 81  

Margaret Lanterman Karl Wirsum was a child of the south side of Chicago, familiar with all the variants and byways of a large and hectic city – one that he truly appreciated. This backdrop could not help but influence his empathetic, spontaneous and soulful art.  After working to develop his own style, he joined five other artists of similar thought …

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Editorial – Volume 35 no 4 March – April 2021

Al Jirikowic No art, worth its salt, is ever obvious. This is why art is enthralling, for art, in all its forms, constantly unfolds before us, often mysteriously. Throughout history we have never looked away from art despite everything that has shaken us. Indeed our compulsion for art exists to uncover all our stories. Bewitched by art we endeavor to …

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Speakeasy – Volume 35 no 4 March – April 2021

THE AMERICAN SCHADENFREUDE EPIDEMIC When an evil clown rules your land, you have to expect a certain decline in moral tone, and rest assured that, last year, schadenfreude reached unprecedented peaks in the United States of America. The term appeared in English as early as the mid 1800s, combining the German words for ‘damage’ and ‘joy,’ and meaning, ‘delight taken …

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Only Connect – E. M. Forster and the Joys of Online Teaching

Colin Fell In a sealed room, somewhere within the bowels of the earth, a woman named Vashti is lecturing to her unseen listeners. She’s been lecturing from underground most of her life – ‘the clumsy system of public gatherings had been long since abandoned; neither Vashti nor her audience stirred from their rooms…’ While lecturing, she turns on her isolation …

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Epidemics Come and Go

Frances Oliver This is the fourth epidemic which has made abrupt changes in my life (see article in the Jan/Feb edition of the NAE); so perhaps I am less surprised by it, and less affected by lockdowns, than most people. As a writer in lockdown: during the first lockdown I kept a boring daily diary, just for my records. During …

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I, Too, Am a Camera

Josephine Gardiner Once every week, regardless of weather, I can be found sitting on a chair in my tiny granite courtyard with a big bowl of soapy water at my feet. I am surrounded by plastic bags of groceries delivered by the local supermarket. The task is to wash each item before passing it to my husband to put away …

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Continental Tribal Drift

Anna Maria Benedetti We are not immortal and we are not even humble. There have been numerous epidemics throughout history: typhus, smallpox, plague, cholera. Viruses mutated and reappeared over time. The only defence was respect for simple rules of daily hygiene, frequent hand washing, keeping a safe distance from others, protecting the nose and mouth, while today we say ‘wear …

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The Guardians of the Earth

Liviana Martin In response to the invitation of Julia and Daniel to write a brief account of the pandemic, my reflections centred not on my own moods (sense of loneliness, helplessness, fear of the unknown), which I think are common to most, but on the spread of the virus, which is also linked to environmental destruction. Our robbery and indiscriminate …

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Survival During the Pandemic

James Cassell I’m a creature accustomed to, if not dependent on, routine. In part, I suppose, it’s my nature. It’s how I obtain some stability. I think of myself as high-strung, and I seek a steadiness and a certain predictability and control in some of the basic areas of my life. I make the bed each morning. I have my …

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