editorial

Editorial

Vale Every so often, even in sadness, it is the pleasure of an editor to thank colleagues for all their hard work and their wisdom. In May this year we said farewell to John Link, a contributing editor and long time writer for the New Art Examiner. His quality of mind is rarely equalled and we are happy to reprint …

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Editorial: Volume 35 no 5 May June 2021

I am planting an orchard. I have been ‘given’ a field by a friend and have 13 trees in it from last year and now he has seen it doing so well we have extended the planting to another 40 or so trees. They will be a mixture of old varieties of fruits interspersed with berry bushes and a few …

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Editorial – Volume 35 no 4 March – April 2021

Al Jirikowic No art, worth its salt, is ever obvious. This is why art is enthralling, for art, in all its forms, constantly unfolds before us, often mysteriously. Throughout history we have never looked away from art despite everything that has shaken us. Indeed our compulsion for art exists to uncover all our stories. Bewitched by art we endeavor to …

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Editorial – Volume 35 no 2 November- December 2019

Pendery Weekes, Derek Guthrie, Daniel Nanavati Finally, with the publication of our November/December issue we’ve nearly reached the end of 2020, an ill-fated and turbulent year. It’s been a year that has kept us riveted to the news with its constant updates and restrictions being imposed, lifted and re-imposed in countries all over the world. It has been challenging to …

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Editorial – Volume 34 no 5 May / June 2020

By Pendery Weekes This issue of the New Art Examiner is unique. Nearly all of us around the world have been under some form of lock-down. Some of us have been confined to our homes, others are allowed to go out for essential food shopping, to pick up medicines at the pharmacy, or to do exercise once a day, others …

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Editorial Volume 34 no 4 March – April 2020

There are some paintings you look at and you wonder who the people were, you muse about the time and place, the fashion, the thinking of the characters and you inspect as far as you are able the skill of the artist. But you have to take another step in your mind to consider philosophical ideas. Then there are paintings …

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Editorial: Volume 34 no 3 January – February 2020

Jeff Koons is not a name to toy with. When he was asked to create a memorial to the victims of terrorism in Paris one may assume the French authorities had lost their minds asking an aesthetic dedicated to Disneyfying the cities of America, to suddenly find the soulfulness of tragedy within humanity and make it tangible. Perhaps they mistook Koons …

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Editorial Volume 33 no 6 September – October 2019

One can fall in love with a magazine. With a passion for its attempt to trust its writers, edit lightly to allow for varied opinion, and its invaluable outlook inherited from the twentieth century pragmatic philosophers in Chicago. A time when America had philosophers everyone with an interest in American power and how it would be wielded, read and discussed. …

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Editorial

Washington October 30th 2018 I was invited to a talk given by Rafael Lorenzo-Hemmer at the Hirshhorn Museum who are exhibiting three of his heart-beat installations. His talk, given at 7pm in the cinema-like auditorium, was an object lesson in complacency. Rafael has, as with other contemporary super-stars, a small full time industrial team of fifteen working on his ideas …

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Editorial

The USA is very unhappy. In particular the poor and the near poor who are mostly women and minorities are unhappy. Frustrated. Bordering on angry. The art scene has lost all gusto and art no longer enjoys the support and prestige it had even in recent memory. Social media has utterly changed the cultural landscape. The president is unique in …

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Editorial Volume 33.no.1 September / October 2018

There is an interesting idea that, broadly speaking, may be categorized as the ‘psychology of history’. It suggests that because we are a psychological animal still prone to instinct, we can read human history purely from the psychological viewpoint to arrive at a better understanding of why the things that happen, happen. To give you the usual example: our leaders …

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Volume 32 no 6 July / August 2018 Editorial

Cages, prisons and walls are odd themes for an editorial. Each possesses subtle differences in meaning and while many innocent people are behind bars, there are many more in the wide world who have made their own “big houses.” The “big house” is hood (ghetto) slang for prison. In the visual arts conformity and exclusion play important roles within academia …

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Editorial Volume 32 no. 5 May June 2018

I write from Washington DC as the New Art Examiner opens a new chapter in the most powerful city in the world. Unlike most capital cities, Washington DC does not have a lively art scene. Political considerations dominate. American politics is in turmoil and the news media every day is breaking news of the deepening political drama. The question is …

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Editorial

As the economy recedes, and as the political crisis deepens, the USA is a land of apprehension. A long way from the post-war boom. That time witnessed the triumph of American abstract art. Art follows the money. Embedded in millennial thinking is the Van Gogh syndrome and also the less spectacular introvert voice of Paul Cezanne, who lays a claim …

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Editorial

Humour can often get a message over more readily than any amount of serious work. Though sensibilities change. Things that were jokes in the 1970s are viewed with disbelief for their sheer political incorrectness today. Conversely, some people look at the horrors of an Hieronymus Bosch with a wry smile so we should not be put off from using humour. …

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