Jane Addams Allen

Northern Italy’s Age of Luminosity

SUMMARY: An impressive exhibition presents the work of Italian artists who congregated in the Emilian town of Parma. “The Age of Correggio and the Carracci: Emilian Painting of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries1’ reveals technical virtuosity, exciting imagery and emotional intensity on busy canvases — a combination that can appeal to those fatigued by the austerity of modern art.   …

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Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

SUMMARY: In this, the centenary of the birth of architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, the attacks continue on the modernist functionalism that he espoused and the glass-and-steel building designs that expressed his vision. Though times have changed, and along with them the needs of architecture, a current New York exhibition of his drawings offers the chance to see Mies …

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An Eclipsed Art Critic Shines Anew

SUMMARY: The quintessential art critic of the 1940s was Clement Greenberg, but In later years his dogmatism came under fire. Two volumes of his finest essays, “Perceptions and Judgments, 1939-1944” and ‘Arrogant Purpose, 1945-1949,” edited by John O’Brian (University of Chicago Press, $27.50 each), should help to restore his reputation. Invigorating is the best way to describe the early writings …

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The Genius of Pablo Picasso

Jane Allen and Derek Guthrie Chicago Tribune 15th April 1973, written overnight on the news of Picasso’s death. In Picasso the 20th century has lost one of its most cherished symbols of freedom. He proved the exception to every rule, and we thought until a short week ago that he might even elude the law of human mortality. Secluded behind …

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Master of the Line

SUMMARY: A new exhibition of Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec’s works at New York’s Museum of Modern Art makes it clear that for Lautrec, the color lithograph, not the painting, was the ultimate work of art. The “how” of the artist’s intense printmaking method is explained by a series of exhibits showing his step-by-step process from rapid sketch to completed print. The …

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The Human Face of an American Icon

Jane Addams Allen 1987 SUMMARY: Georgia O’Keeffe cultivated an image as hard and austere as the bones and mountains that were her favorite subjects. But a National Gallery of Art exhibition featuring rarely seen works and many of O’Keeffe’s personal letters offers another view and makes clear that she was an intensely alive artist, passionate about her work. We are …

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Wheelers, dealers and supercollectors

Where are they taking the art market? Behind the artist in the act of creation stands the collector. His piggish eyes are gleaming, and his right hand firmly clutches the bulging money bag at his belt. Greed, as the 16th century drawing “The Painter and the Connoisseur” by Brueghel makes clear, has always been a part of the world in …

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