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The Changing Landscape of Utah Art

By Scotti Hill in Utah As a state, Utah conjures two predominant associations: Mormonism and mountains. Maybe parks and monuments too. But Salt Lake City, one of the youngest and fastest–growing metro areas in the nation, is today animated by a vibrant counterculture, overflowing with coffee shops, microbreweries, and community murals. Utah boasts a thriving arts community in SLC and …

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Contemporary Art and Ambition in the American West

by Darren Jones, Contributing Editor,  in Salt Lake City Utah is a romantic wanderer’s grail: its chromatic spectrum, the metaphysical power of its topographies and its geopolitical location combine to make it the nexus of lore and industry which defines the Western United States. Utah’s history has often set epic human endeavor against celestial grandeur, casting this vast territory in …

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Peaks and Valleys: The Rise of Utah’s Alternative Art Platforms

By Christopher Lynn in Utah Geologically, the state of Utah is a panoply of strata, formations, and colors. From the sterile expanses of the Bonneville Salt Flats, to the soaring peaks of the Wasatch Mountain Range, to the otherworldly red rock deserts of the south, Utah is constantly and slowly changing. Wind and water contour stone; floods and droughts reveal, …

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The Story of Women

by Loretta Pettinato in Brescia Translated by Laura Pettinato Starting from January 2020, various Italian cities began promoting different cultural initiatives which revolve around the female universe, to pay tribute to women. Inside the Martinengo Palace in Brescia an exhibition has been organized with artwork from 1500 to 1900, entitled Women in Art. There are 90 paintings by artists such …

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Fictitious Landscapes – 原本在是次展覧展出的駐港藝術家陸浩明

by Ivy Leung in Hong Kong Due to the ravages of Covid-19, the Art Basel Hong Kong 2020 held in Hong Kong every March was cancelled. The works of Hong Kong-based artist Andrew Luk (b.1988) and the post-war master Chu Teh-Chun (1920-2014), originally planned to be exhibited in Art Basel, are in the de Sarthe Gallery exhibition, Shifting Landscape. Andrew …

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Slavery Refined for Liberals

by Annie Markovich When it was possible to visit the Tate in person, toward the end of February, all the press packs for Fons Americanus were gone. A double bill with Olafur Eliasson’s In Real Life drew crowds, and on a Friday night Tate Turbine was packed, hopping with a dance club atmosphere. Massive halls, which seemed to be looking …

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Hidden Within

by Anita Di Rienzo, Milan.   Ancient paintings are often referred to as ‘pieces of history’, a definition which explains how a work of art acquires greater meaning, showing how we are able to historicise and exchange information through paintings. What is a painting in the end if not the only language common to all, through which it is possible …

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Anonymous Society for Magick/ 煉法社

Ivy Leung in Hong Kong ‘Anonymous Society’, a special name, feels mysterious. ‘Magick’ refers to magic. Magic is the reflection of the individual’s spirit and a psychological activity that transcends the real world. Aleister Crowley was an occultist and ceremonial magician in the early 19th-century. He believed that ‘Magick’ is the science and art of causing change to occur in …

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Leon Golub: A Country No Longer United

by Viktor Witkowski Leon Golub would certainly find many reasons and occasions to make paintings of our current time. He would not feel elevated about that prospect in any way, but he would understand and accept the responsibility to find ways for painting to engage its viewers beyond pictorial references and formalist nodes to past as well as contemporary artists. …

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