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A Window on Our Souls

Materially and spatially transcendent, High Windows is an organism, a system, within which we are asked to confront evolutionary mechanisms of life, time, and function through the body—an anthropocenic arc of birth and decay. A post-war print house in a district dense with demolition and new construction is the site of Mateusz Choróbski’s first solo show with Galeria Wschod. The …

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Hybrid Sculpture, Disciplined Form

SUMMARY: Nancy Graves has taken her sculpture past her initial success with camels. Her work features an uncanny ability to meld disparate materials decisively. She clearly has a superb eye and an inventive mind: Only an adherence to American modernism holds her back. Colorful, budding bronzes bloom in the sculpture garden of the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington. Sprouting fans and …

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Goodbye and thanks for all the art

“It looks like you’re going to get into a vehicle and you’re going to travel…..” The Biennale of Venice, defined by Codswallop artist Ken Turner as a funfair, has unveiled an installation that is really the “ultimate” in design. A very stylish pod, reminiscent of the pods in the 1956 film, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, encases an easy-death casket. …

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Madrid’s Montmartre

If you expected to find in Caixaforum’s futuristic premises a retrospective solo exhibition about the art of famous and iconic painter Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, or if you long for something new, technological, exciting or bizarre you may be disappointed by these elegant, relaxing and scholarly lessons in art and life called ‘Toulouse-Lautrec and the spirit of Montmartre’. I felt as …

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Sokurov and Rembrandt

In only one day, we could not possibly hope to see everything at the 2019 Venice Biennale but we walked through the Arsenal and the Gardini Gardens and managed to look at more than 30 exhibitions (there are at least 30 pavilions of nations.) Amongst several very good and memorable pavilions, the Russian exhibition stood out as far superior. It …

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Daniel Dodin

Tiny, black spindly figures carrying large loads on their heads, set amidst floating clouds of rust and blue acrylic paint: this is Daniel Dodin’s 3 metre long painting in the Seychelles Pavilion at the 2019 Venice Biennale. I saw the painting in Dodin’s studio at the Seychelles College of Art where he is a lecturer, while it was still unfinished. …

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Leon Radegonde

Leon Radegonde’s work is a reminder that the Seychelles isn’t just about a tropical paradise. His use of everyday materials – salvaged waste, old sheet metal, shop keepers’ notebooks, sackcloth and rags – intimates the social struggle these islands have witnessed. He honours many of his people who would decorate their wood and tin walls with layers of pages cut …

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A Quick Review of Cuban Art Today

A trip from Michigan to visit Cuba, in late October 2018, seemed intriguing on many fronts, not least the warm weather, nice beaches, an unusual destination, a big history between Cuba and the USA, and mostly for me the reputation that Cuban art and culture were of a high quality and present throughout the country. Our plane landed near Havana …

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Contemporary Art at the Smithsonian American Art Museum

The Smithsonian American Art Museum is a repository of portraits, historical paintings and contemporary American paintings located in Washington, D.C. Carefully selected works dating back to post WWII are presented in a quiet, well-lighted space where visitors are encouraged to walk, reflect and use the imagination. A visit to the National Museum of American Art on a bright Sunday was …

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