News

Phoenix? What Phoenix?

In our recent whirlwind of name change adventure, the New Art Examiner un-earthed its history, reclaimed its soul and sprang forward. This was the tough medicine that was called for – almost as if it was ruefully preordained. We brushed up on our mission statement, indeed brushed it off, for all to see. The New Art Examiner then sprang from …

Read More »

The Hidden Struggle for America’s Soul

Gary Weiss, ‘Ayn Rand Nation’  Gary Weiss was inspired to write his book when he realised, after the crash, after the orgy of deregulation and greed that led to the crash, there was a ‘missing piece to the puzzle.’ ‘The philosophy of greed had a philosopher’ and that philosopher was Ayn Rand. Like many others, Weiss had dismissed Ayn Rand …

Read More »

Letters Volume 33 no 5 May-June 2019

UK’s Art Market Editor, considering the global art market data in The Art Market released by Art Basel and UBS, “Sales in the three largest markets of the US, the UK, and China accounted for 84% of the global market’s total value in 2018: The US was the largest market worldwide, accounting for 44% of sales by value. The UK …

Read More »

Why Art Criticism Matters and Why of it Doesn’t

Judgment We mustn’t judge. This is what we are taught. But the directive is a misplaced affectation based on a few hundred years of superficial civilizing. It is our primeval nature to judge, as all animals must. If we didn’t, we wouldn’t survive long; we’d make decisions that would sooner rather than later, cause us to fail catastrophically. Calamities happen …

Read More »

Speakeasy

Each issue the New Art Examiner will invite an art world personality to write a speakeasy essay on a topic of interest. Olga Korper has dedicated her life and career to the service of conceptual contemporary art. Olga has consistently been a source of wisdom and guidance for artists, fellow dealers, and aspiring collectors, from the Olga Korper Gallery, 17 …

Read More »

Editorial

Washington, May 2019 This issue of the New Art Examiner acknowledges we made a mistake by attempting to change our name to the New Art Gazette. We were frightened by a lawyer’s advice pointing out the possibility of being sued. On second thought, we decided this was unlikely and the publisher would be happy to go to court to defend …

Read More »

LOST KAWS: MORAL TURPITUDE AND OB$CENITY IN CONTEMPORARY ART

The art industry defines each generation by a very few artists, and buries the rest in an unmarked, mass grave. As the machinery supporting them grinds into production with prestigious museum exhibitions, globe-spanning presence, and schiltrons of press coverage, they are riveted into the scaffolding of art history. These extraordinary efforts are to convince ostensibly the public, but actually wealthy …

Read More »

Volume 33 no 4 March-April 2019

In this issue: Zero-Sum Culture: Jorge M Benitez The disease of Grade Inflation: Stephen Luecking Exhibit Heightens Gaugin Myth: Jane Addams Allen Ayn Rand – A Defence for the Indefensible: Frances Oliver Museum politics in Toronto:  Rae Johnson Frank Gehry at 90: Lili Lihting Your  letters. Editorial by Derek Guthrie Scouting the blogs with Miklos Legrady Recommended reading Bentonville: Daniel …

Read More »

Editorial

I was invited to a talk given by Rafael Lorenzo-Hemmer at the Hirshhorn Museum who are exhibiting three of his heart-beat installations. His talk, given at 7pm in the cinema-like auditorium, was an object lesson in complacency. Rafael has, as with other contemporary super-stars, a small full time industrial team of fifteen working on his ideas and when he said …

Read More »

“Making art is … making love to the world.”

Since he first opened an architecture studio in 1964, Gehry has created a profound sense of beauty and energy, wrapped around utilitarian structures. He expounds a free expressive form with out of the box thinking and boldness. His approach is influenced by his emotional reactions to the visual experience which he communicates in a simple, straightforward, and unpretentious way. His …

Read More »