News

Relating to Rae Johnson in Toronto

Ever see a hugemongous drawing? Rae Johnson’s paintings, average 48”, appear as pencil drawings writ large. Walk up to one, and it introduces itself and shakes your hand as a painting, but it’s a painting of brush strokes imitating a huge pencil or watercolor. In an era where artists put their shoes on the table and call it art, it’s …

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All-consuming Beauty

I was walking past a nail bar, one of the kind you find from the centre of London to provincial market towns, and caught sight of the small-print words ‘Fat Freezing’ on the sign swinging outside. I wondered why this was not strange. I stopped and read the sign. The words that had simultaneously attracted and repelled me were in …

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Van Gogh in Arles

The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Van Gough in Arles show, which opened to the public in October 18 is both exhilarating and crushingly depressing. What unfolds at the Met is a tragedy of grand dimensions. There has seldom been this show which follows an artist development so intimately on the day to day basis nor one which reveals so clearly …

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Glenstone Penitentiary

Intensely anticipated by the New York and DC art community, October 4 marked the public opening of the Mitch and Emily Rales’ Foundation’s “Pavilions”. Billing itself as the latest U.S. non-profit museum, it may not qualify as a museum at all. According to the International Council of Museums, a worldwide body of museum professionals a museum is “a non-profit permanent …

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Bearing Witness, Not Weapons

Jill Gibbon Skypes with our European Editor DN: Thank you very much for talking to the New Art Examiner today. I wanted to know a little bit about your background. When did you first think you were going to be an artist? When did you first decide you wanted to be an artist? JG: Oh, that goes back a really …

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Speakeasy Volume 33 no 2 November / December 2018

Political Art is not Historical Art. In keeping with his years long tradition of making political oil paintings and lithographs satirizing and glorifying the Trump administration, Brigham Young University adjunct professor Jon McNaughton has produced “Crossing the Swamp”. An oil painting with numerous gliclees and lithographs resulting from it, inspired by the German-American painter Emanuel Leutze’s 1851 painting, Crossing the …

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Editorial

The USA is very unhappy. In particular the poor and the near poor who are mostly women and minorities are unhappy. Frustrated. Bordering on angry. The art scene has lost all gusto and art no longer enjoys the support and prestige it had even in recent memory. Social media has utterly changed the cultural landscape. The president is unique in …

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Letters Volume 33 no 2 November / December 2018

Is There Anybody there? Hi Al, I really enjoyed your review of Francisco Toledo. Why do you think that Washington has a “largely insensitive and lax art community”? Wasn’t it just perhaps that American University was the wrong venue for showing his work and that possibly there wasn’t enough publicity to make people aware of his exhibit? Richard Grant 30/08/2018 …

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Volume 33.no.1 September / October 2018

In this issue: Speakeasy with Melanie Manos, our new Detroit editor We interview one of Bernard Leach’s finest apprentices, John Bedding Why artists’ fail by Darren Jones in New York The Autonomies of Art by Clement Greenberg, a lecture given in Virginia. Clement Greenberg reconsidered by Jane Allen To the 75,000 Readers of MOMUS magazine by Miklos Legrady, our Toronto …

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Film Review: The Square

I went to see Robert Östlund’s film THE SQUARE expecting a satirical gibe at post-modernist art, and wondering what new it could offer. From half-cows in formaldehyde to unmade beds to the tools and carpenter’s horses blocking the stairs in a staid old Swiss museum (Why have the workmen left their things here, I wanted to know, and was told …

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