News

Beauty and the Beast

In 1946 John Cocteau took this fairy story and made of it a film for adults, it was to become a classic, one of his most famous films. Made in black and white, and with music by Georges Auric, it is wonderfully strewn with magical moments, stone heads on plinths, the eyes following the goings–on,; a door which introduces itself, …

Read More »

Fashionably Unborn

Cartier, Buccellati (Timeless Art), Tiffany & Co and Bulgari should be on the lookout for the work of Baby Bee Hummingbirds with their jewellery that is taking the market by surprise. People who have ever wondered what to do with their leftover IVF embryos in storage and can’t use them, don’t want to keep on paying the hefty storage fees …

Read More »

Andrea Limauro and Arnaud Leclere

Limauro’s strokes remind me of the slow buildup of henna designs, or eyelet lace, silver sequins in a fan pattern on a sari. “Sweet Escape” 48”x48,” takes on a completely different approach to seascapes. The waves ground the composition in an aqua series of half fans, and the horizon line is a low, red land. With so many small strokes, …

Read More »

Art as Blood

In this beautiful exhibition on Baroque, the common thread that links the works of the seventeenth century to contemporary art is not so much the style or content of the works as the concept of “Baroque” and its implications. After the rationality of art, the purity of the forms, the grace of the Renaissance, exploded in seventeenth century Europe and …

Read More »

Adoring Paolo Veronese

Every year around Christmas, the Diocesan Museum exhibits a Masterpiece. This tradition has been going on for over ten years and this time the painting was the “Adoration of the Magi” by Paolo Veronese, one of the leading lights of the Venetian Renaissance. The canvas comes from the Santa Corona church in Vicenza and is an immense altar tablet (2,20 …

Read More »

Craft 101

‘Simplicity! What a hard thing to achieve’. May Davis The Mahoney Collection of Crowan Pottery, made by Harry & May Davis, from 1946-1962, reveals a stunning combination of function and beauty. This is real pottery made by genuine potters in a traditional way. Nowadays, it almost seems as though ‘ceramics’ look down from their lofty porcelain towers on the humble, …

Read More »

Fish Out of Water

Entering through the hills on an impossibly narrow meandering road you have presented one the best views in Europe; the bay of St Ives. From there, while descending to this subtropical paradise, you are taken back a few centuries with the streets tighter and cobbled. Where the beaches are golden, natural life is lush, and the seagulls own the skies. …

Read More »

Portraiture captures far more than a person

This exhibition shows self–portraits of the Newlyn School artists alongside portraits by other artists, amusing caricatures and photographs with the addition of mini biographies. This results in unusual opportunities to see the artists in different ways and is far more interesting than I had anticipated. I found out that Tuke said Newlyn was ‘simply reeking with subjects’. Charles Naper was …

Read More »

The Newlyn Society Demands Thought

The preview was full of artists who knew one another, and had a lively buzz which erupted after an introductory talk. Dr. Ryya Bread curated the show. Each work had the writing that inspired it also on the wall, not always exhibited at a good height for reading. Some of the writings were poems. It was a constant challenge to …

Read More »

Don McCullin

This is Humanity This is Truth This is Politics Don McCullin is a photojournalist whose career has taken him to reaches of the world where war, politics and human tragedy have been brutally played out. He has dedicated his life and camera skills to documenting these events in the hope of bringing about change by those with the power to …

Read More »

Europe Defines the African Art Market

Does the African art world have a centre? Europe’s art capitals emerged as the most able to achieve visibility and the institutional validation of contemporary art from Africa. It appears this compelled, and was somewhat mitigated by, the ‘decolonising’ curatorial thrust driving the exhibitions studied in a new report by Corrigall & Co, a South African based art research consultancy. …

Read More »

MCA is all body and little soul

In August 1992, when the dog days were drawing to an end, I set off to walk the county of Suffolk, in the hope of distilling the emptiness that takes hold of me whenever I have completed a long stint of work. And in fact my hope was realized, up to a point; for I have seldom felt so carefree …

Read More »

Northern Italy’s Age of Luminosity

SUMMARY: An impressive exhibition presents the work of Italian artists who congregated in the Emilian town of Parma. “The Age of Correggio and the Carracci: Emilian Painting of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries1’ reveals technical virtuosity, exciting imagery and emotional intensity on busy canvases — a combination that can appeal to those fatigued by the austerity of modern art.   …

Read More »

Phoenix? What Phoenix?

In our recent whirlwind of name change adventure, the New Art Examiner un-earthed its history, reclaimed its soul and sprang forward. This was the tough medicine that was called for – almost as if it was ruefully preordained. We brushed up on our mission statement, indeed brushed it off, for all to see. The New Art Examiner then sprang from …

Read More »

The Hidden Struggle for America’s Soul

Gary Weiss, ‘Ayn Rand Nation’  Gary Weiss was inspired to write his book when he realised, after the crash, after the orgy of deregulation and greed that led to the crash, there was a ‘missing piece to the puzzle.’ ‘The philosophy of greed had a philosopher’ and that philosopher was Ayn Rand. Like many others, Weiss had dismissed Ayn Rand …

Read More »