News

Eva Biennial – Artists’ Referendum on Resistance

Summary: Guerrero created an important invitation to a long, ongoing conversation through orchestrating key voices from many different perspectives. This was not about art market viability, but rather a testimony to the power of collective voices.   Juxtapositions of decadence and abjection, survival and compassion, are created with clever consider-ation in each venue of the Eva International Biennial 2018. Held …

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The Editors Discuss David Wojnarowicz

Daniel/Derek, I’d like to write about the Whitney’s current David Wojnarowicz exhibition. Here’s the idea. EVERYONE is writing about it with non-objective, cloying praise. No critic has a bad word to say about it. When I went, I was hugely disappointed. Not in the work (which I love and wrote about) but in the show itself. This would be a …

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Remembering the Futurists

The title of this massive exhibition at the Fondazione Prada in Milan refers to Tommaso Marinetti’s visual poem, founder of the Futurist movement in the 20s. However, it would not be correct to define it only as an exhibition on futurism because it is much more complex; it took over two years for the curator, Germano Celant, to prepare the …

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To the 750,000 Readers of MOMUS

and let’s not forget the readers of Canadian Art Magazine. Is MOMUS returning to art criticism? Is Canadian Art ignoring it? I offered MOMUS editor Sky Goodden first crack at publishing this critique of her own journal. My argument was that she’d raise MOMUS above the fray by enabling an uncomfortable discussion on the vulnerability of art magazines. The same concept was …

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An Eclipsed Art Critic Shines Anew

SUMMARY: The quintessential art critic of the 1940s was Clement Greenberg, but In later years his dogmatism came under fire. Two volumes of his finest essays, “Perceptions and Judgments, 1939-1944” and ‘Arrogant Purpose, 1945-1949,” edited by John O’Brian (University of Chicago Press, $27.50 each), should help to restore his reputation. Invigorating is the best way to describe the early writings …

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Autonomies of Art

Never before published in print, a lecture given by Clement Greenberg in Mountain Lake, Virginia in October 1980. Art and life. Art and life as lived can be seen as one and inseparable only when art is experienced sheerly as a phenomenon among other phenomena. Art experienced as art, art experienced aesthetically, “properly,” art experienced at what’s called aesthetic distance, …

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A Mantle of Scraps: Why Artists Fail

It isn’t easy. Deciding to pursue one’s vocation as an artist within the system involves tacit acceptance of probable economic adversity and elusive professional returns, in a capricious field of unreliable values. Youthful naiveté regarding stability may overcome uncertainty, but the compulsion to make sense of life via artistic mandate is under increasing pressure from practicalities. As the years go …

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Editorial Volume 33.no.1 September / October 2018

There is an interesting idea that, broadly speaking, may be categorized as the ‘psychology of history’. It suggests that because we are a psychological animal still prone to instinct, we can read human history purely from the psychological viewpoint to arrive at a better understanding of why the things that happen, happen. To give you the usual example: our leaders …

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