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The Sky Above, Earth Below Redux

One hundred and twenty-three years ago, the world set its gaze on Chicago. Would this new city of one million citizens, only 22 years removed from the Great Fire, pull off a world’s fair, the grand Columbian Exposition? To the surprise of everyone – including those promoting the initiative – the city did. A major challenge was finding housing to …

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LIVING OFF, NOT WITH, A LEGACY

The Dilemma of the Penwith Society The Penwith was formed in the late 1940’s when the members were truly avant garde,. It has enjoyed 25 years of St Ives Modernism under the likes of Hepworth, Nicholson, Lanyon, Berlin et al. That history has no bearing on its future. It has gone. Once St Ives had over 150 artists’ studios. It …

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Post-Modernism – its Origins, Features and Relevance

‘A new world began in 1910’ said Roger Fry who organized the Post-Impressionist art exhibition at the Grafton Gallery in London that year. The new world in question was modernism in art, and the arts generally, which was effectively launched by that exhibition which included not only the work of Gauguin,Van Gogh, the Pont Aven School and the Fauvists but …

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The Degeneration of the Avant-Garde into Fashion

The Times – God bless its little cotton socks – has just been celebrating the triumphal return of the 1990s as a creative force. “Suddenly contemporary art” it crows, “was part of popular culture. The Royal Academy’s landmark Sensation show in 1997 was a turning point.” It was so indeed, but not exactly in the terms the article intends. Here …

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One Way To Think Like An Artist

“Our heads are round so that thoughts can change direction.” Thinking about ‘thinking’ is one way of paying attention. We can look, think, envision, gaze, fancy, ponder, dream, reflect, stare into the distance, imagine and/or remember things as they swim into our minds. It is doubtful any one of these ‘methods’ could result in a new thought. To be successful …

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Night Divides the Day …

The Doors in *Break on Through* The desire for high-class oddities is nothing new in sophisticated society. The educated have always loved this stuff. The eighteenth century English constructed “ruins” in their gardens that they viewed through smoked glass, making them seem older and more romantic. Gentlemen carried human gallstones to social gatherings to use for starting conversations. The French …

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Cultural Dictatorship at the New York Times

It is an astonishing peculiarity that in New York there is just one newspaper setting the tone of cultural opinion: The New York Times. There are other publications but they haven’t a fraction of its influence. There is no equal counter-argument to penetrate The Times’ taste-making monopoly lodged so deeply into the city’s DNA; not the New York Observer, The …

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Speakeasy

The Context of Creation For the course of 20th century art the narrative of the art world has romanticized a particular set of variables in regards to the creative space of the artist. The picturesque idea of the high ceilinged loft/industrial space in which the artist creates has, over the past century, been instilled in both the general public and …

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Humans Can Only Create Corrupt Systems

The regular refrain about the art market being overpriced , overblown and an anchor weighing down creativity in our culture won’t go away. Ever. The reason is quite simple and anyone who has researched patronage even briefly, and the monetary system itself will understand: money panders to ego, vanity and power. So can art. The inherent corruption of money is …

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The Future is With Us.

With this issue, the New Art Examiner marks its first year back following a thirteen-year break. Our return, which began at Expo Chicago last September, has not been easy. We have managed to publish six forty-plus page issues with minimal advertising or subscription income. We have survived on pure faith and art-fed fumes. We owe a great deal to the …

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