News

Trouble in Painter’s Paradise

Few 20th-century painters carved a niche for their craft like Paul Gauguin. His portraiture is some of the most recognisable work in modern art. From 7th October 2019 to 26th January 2020, the National Gallery in London has on display a large representation of Gauguin’s short career as a painter featuring a collection of portraiture and sculpture. For an artist …

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Truman Capote

Truman Capote has long been one of my most revered writers, so when we popped into a book shop in Chapel Street, Penzance and there, face on, in the middle of a display shelf, was Truman Capote’s book, Answered Prayers, I hesitated but moments. Answered Prayers is not a novel, it is three random chapters of a novel for which he …

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Brzeżańska’s Stories from Earth

Agnieszka Brzeżańska’s World National Park is akin to that first moment after waking from an intense dream. Brzeżańska’s collective works—paintings, drawings, collage, some sound and video—suggest a story of earthly, human existence through time. They are stories of mark-making, of record-keeping, of illustrating ideas and dreams and stories, both real and invented. The first room contains a series of works …

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Elkins on Art Criticism

How do we judge art and what is the role of the art critic? This article compares James Elkins’ (2003) views on art criticism, with those of others and my own. I am an amateur collector and a psychologist. James Elkins (2003) claims that art criticism is produced and ignored in equal measure. It is not rooted in any academic …

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Volume 34 no 3 January – February 2020: Letters

Editorial 33.6 Dear Editor, Are you suggesting that American philosophers no longer exist? What about David Abram, philosopher, ecologist and performance artist? Marilyn McCord Adams, who recently died? Owen Flanagan with his work on the philosophy of the mind? David Carrier, American philosopher and also art critic? Have you heard of Professor Michael Slote, professor of ethics? The list of …

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The Seductive Economy: Sex, Mettle and Labor in the Art of Donna Nadeau 

Occasionally, a life lived under immensely stressful, even brutal circumstances forms the crucible for an artist to respond in ways that realize art’s fullest potential as a reflection on human endeavor. A volatile balance of experiences on the societal periphery—beyond the majority’s empiric knowledge—can result in work of such honesty and connectivity that it transcends the specifics of its production, …

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Is It Time to End the Whitney Biennial?

With the recent announcement of the Whitney Biennial’s 2021 curators, the next iteration has juddered into production; but should it? From its inception the Biennial’s organizers have made grandiose claims that they had no way—or no intention—of achieving. Nevertheless, it is regarded as the preeminent survey of art-making in the United States. For artists it remains the most sought after …

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Volume 34 no.2 November/December 2019

In this issue: Speakeasy with Annie Markovich Lynda Green on appreciating Edward Hopper Jane Addams Allen and Derek Guthrie from Chicago Tribune on Edward Hopper’s legacy Al Jirikowic, Washington D.C. Editor, looking at Edward Hopper Margaret Lanterman and Phillip Barcio review Expo Chicago 2019 The Legacy of Apathy –  a talk  given by Derek Guthrie in Washington D.C. 2019 John …

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