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Howard Finster at Carl Hammer Gallery

The first of the texts to grab my attention at Outsider Artist Howard Finster’s current show on display at Carl Hammer Gallery is a white clad angel enveloped in images of flying women in multi-colored dresses titled, “Heaven is for all people.”, completed in 1983. “Heaven is for All People, Jesus makes it plain how to get there. If you …

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Middling Balm

Patrick Heron at Tate St.Ives Patrick Heron’s writing on art put the St.Ives artists into public view. It’s a very enjoyable show with captions featuring remarks Patrick Heron wrote about painting, about the need to achieve balance, about the way the edges of a painting are so important as the onlooker’s eyes look from them to different points in the …

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Francisco Toledo: Mexico’s Psyche

Once again Washington DC’s largely insensitive and lax art community has seen an art maestro come and go. Francisco Toledo, hailing and thriving in Oaxaca Mexico, celebrated throughout the world, stirred not a yawn in the Washington DC art scene. He should have. The work of Toledo is primal, pyscho-sexual abundance, sub-conscious disruption and beauty. He works in many media …

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Minimalist Respite in Pittsburgh

In this, her third solo show, entitled You Will Arrive, at 707 Gallery, April 28 – June 17, Pittsburgh based artist Kara Skylling’s focus is on crafting intimately scaled, minimalist works on paper utilizing grid-like pencil designs and compartmentalized muted color. It is apparent that Skylling’s carefully conceived, rigidly controlled, underlying designs rely on a systematic approach to create frameworks …

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Power at the MOMA

This sprawling Adrian Piper retrospective offers an eye-catching challenge to visitors through its sometimes demure, sometimes hectoring, text-and-photo and performance art. Sticking with it pays off with a reflective, ethical and political pow. Piper was born in New York in 1948 and went with the counter-cultural flow of figurative psychedelia, changed to a somewhat purist Minimalism and Conceptualism before turning …

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Life at the Met

While an ambitious attempt to elide culturally and chronologically diverse, popular, scientific, and artistic sculptures of the human body, The Met’s “Like Life” overreaches. The show is ironically shapeless, despite sub-thematic organizational scheme. In addition, the several carved and polychromed Renaissance martyrs and slightly creepy Victorian material (such as effigies of organic matter and death masks), while relevant, are overstated …

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To The Ends of the Earth

Forest green painted walls are lined by white negative space. The color green is associated with life, harmony, and energy. An explanatory introduction and one thoughtful quote are also painted, but in white. I have an idea of what is to come next. A line of spotlights trail overhead, illuminating every wall, including the entryway, reminding me of the sun’s …

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Monet’s Tanks or the Beauty of Warfare

The above photo is of the NATO Saber Strike exercises in Poland that took place from May to June 2017. Taking away the tanks it could appear to be a painting by Claude Monet; however, the tanks are there, though camouflaged with foliage in a field of flowers. The blue flowers and green grass and undergrowth in the foreground are …

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Marcel Il Lusoire Frottage

Marcel Il Lusoire Frottage  was born in Eastbourne in 1962 to Huguenot parents. He attended a local school where he suffered much persecution due to his dislike of sport and his already burgeoning interest in the Art World. He left Eastbourne in 1980 and moved to London where he attended the Chelsea School of Art. He did not actually have a …

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A decade too much, Luis Jacob 10 years later

This is one of the posts that go me banned from akimbo, the Canadian art advertising network. There’s a smell of insider-trading, then censorship to silence the whistle-blower. If art is anything you can get away with, the worst you can get away with is always the best strategy, leading to a consistent degradation of the field. Some ten years …

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