News

Portraiture captures far more than a person

This exhibition shows self–portraits of the Newlyn School artists alongside portraits by other artists, amusing caricatures and photographs with the addition of mini biographies. This results in unusual opportunities to see the artists in different ways and is far more interesting than I had anticipated. I found out that Tuke said Newlyn was ‘simply reeking with subjects’. Charles Naper was …

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The Newlyn Society Demands Thought

The preview was full of artists who knew one another, and had a lively buzz which erupted after an introductory talk. Dr. Ryya Bread curated the show. Each work had the writing that inspired it also on the wall, not always exhibited at a good height for reading. Some of the writings were poems. It was a constant challenge to …

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Don McCullin

This is Humanity This is Truth This is Politics Don McCullin is a photojournalist whose career has taken him to reaches of the world where war, politics and human tragedy have been brutally played out. He has dedicated his life and camera skills to documenting these events in the hope of bringing about change by those with the power to …

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Europe Defines the African Art Market

Does the African art world have a centre? Europe’s art capitals emerged as the most able to achieve visibility and the institutional validation of contemporary art from Africa. It appears this compelled, and was somewhat mitigated by, the ‘decolonising’ curatorial thrust driving the exhibitions studied in a new report by Corrigall & Co, a South African based art research consultancy. …

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MCA is all body and little soul

In August 1992, when the dog days were drawing to an end, I set off to walk the county of Suffolk, in the hope of distilling the emptiness that takes hold of me whenever I have completed a long stint of work. And in fact my hope was realized, up to a point; for I have seldom felt so carefree …

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Northern Italy’s Age of Luminosity

SUMMARY: An impressive exhibition presents the work of Italian artists who congregated in the Emilian town of Parma. “The Age of Correggio and the Carracci: Emilian Painting of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries1’ reveals technical virtuosity, exciting imagery and emotional intensity on busy canvases — a combination that can appeal to those fatigued by the austerity of modern art.   …

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Phoenix? What Phoenix?

In our recent whirlwind of name change adventure, the New Art Examiner un-earthed its history, reclaimed its soul and sprang forward. This was the tough medicine that was called for – almost as if it was ruefully preordained. We brushed up on our mission statement, indeed brushed it off, for all to see. The New Art Examiner then sprang from …

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The Hidden Struggle for America’s Soul

Gary Weiss, ‘Ayn Rand Nation’  Gary Weiss was inspired to write his book when he realised, after the crash, after the orgy of deregulation and greed that led to the crash, there was a ‘missing piece to the puzzle.’ ‘The philosophy of greed had a philosopher’ and that philosopher was Ayn Rand. Like many others, Weiss had dismissed Ayn Rand …

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Letters Volume 33 no 5 May-June 2019

UK’s Art Market Editor, considering the global art market data in The Art Market released by Art Basel and UBS, “Sales in the three largest markets of the US, the UK, and China accounted for 84% of the global market’s total value in 2018: The US was the largest market worldwide, accounting for 44% of sales by value. The UK …

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Why Art Criticism Matters and Why of it Doesn’t

Judgment We mustn’t judge. This is what we are taught. But the directive is a misplaced affectation based on a few hundred years of superficial civilizing. It is our primeval nature to judge, as all animals must. If we didn’t, we wouldn’t survive long; we’d make decisions that would sooner rather than later, cause us to fail catastrophically. Calamities happen …

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