Home » Tag Archives: Al Jirikowic

Tag Archives: Al Jirikowic

Volume 34 no.2 November/December 2019

In this issue: Speakeasy with Annie Markovich Lynda Green on appreciating Edward Hopper Jane Addams Allen and Derek Guthrie from Chicago Tribune on Edward Hopper’s legacy Al Jirikowic, Washington D.C. Editor, looking at Edward Hopper Margaret Lanterman and Phillip Barcio review Expo Chicago 2019 The Legacy of Apathy –  a talk  given by Derek Guthrie in Washington D.C. 2019 John …

Read More »

A slight look into Edward Hopper

I think we now have a certain advantage of “time” in respect to our viewing of Edward Hopper’s work. It is how he came into his “own” that I wish to discuss. I am taken by the life of Hopper’s “own”, a “resplendent” throughout his life’s work. Hopper is usually discussed for his take on the lonesome American city or …

Read More »

Cultural Conspiracy

 “The conscious and intelligent manipulation of the organized habits and opinions of the masses is an important element in democratic society. Those who manipulate this unseen mechanism of society constitute an invisible government which is the true ruling power of our country… It is they who pull the wires which control the public mind.” Edward L. Bernays   This operates …

Read More »

Speakeasy

Each issue the New Art Examiner will invite an art world personality to write a speakeasy essay on a topic of interest. Al Jirikowic lives and works in Washington DC and is our DC Editor. A long-time reader of the New Art Examiner, he ran the famous bar in Adams Morgan, ‘Chief Ike’s Mambo Room’.  Phillip Kennecott of the Washington …

Read More »

Phoenix? What Phoenix?

In our recent whirlwind of name change adventure, the New Art Examiner un-earthed its history, reclaimed its soul and sprang forward. This was the tough medicine that was called for – almost as if it was ruefully preordained. We brushed up on our mission statement, indeed brushed it off, for all to see. The New Art Examiner then sprang from …

Read More »

Volume 33 no 2 November / December 2018

Features: 6 Bearing witness, not weapons Jill Gibbon interviewed by Daniel Nanavati 11 glenstone penitentiary Nancy Schreiber 15 van gogh in arles Jane Addams Allen, 1986, the marketing of the Metropolitan 20. All consuming beauty Rosanna Hildyard on John Berger and Naomi Wolf 27 white supremacy, benevolent institutions and shinola Rebekah Modrak 35. Dressing for that final journey Pendery Weekes, …

Read More »

Marking the Infinite:

Contemporary Women Artists from Aboriginal Australia   The Phillips Collection: Marking the Infinite, spotlights nine leading Aboriginal Australian women artists: Nonggirrnga Marawili, Wintjiya Napaltjarri, Yukultji Napangati, Angelina Pwerle, Lena Yarinkura, Gulumbu Yunupingu, Nyapanyapa Yunupingu, Carlene West, and Regina Pilawuk Wilson. The artists are from remote Aboriginal communities across Australia, and the subjects of their art are broad, yet each work …

Read More »

The Editors Discuss David Wojnarowicz

Daniel/Derek, I’d like to write about the Whitney’s current David Wojnarowicz exhibition. Here’s the idea. EVERYONE is writing about it with non-objective, cloying praise. No critic has a bad word to say about it. When I went, I was hugely disappointed. Not in the work (which I love and wrote about) but in the show itself. This would be a …

Read More »

Francisco Toledo: Mexico’s Psyche

Once again Washington DC’s largely insensitive and lax art community has seen an art maestro come and go. Francisco Toledo, hailing and thriving in Oaxaca Mexico, celebrated throughout the world, stirred not a yawn in the Washington DC art scene. He should have. The work of Toledo is primal, pyscho-sexual abundance, sub-conscious disruption and beauty. He works in many media …

Read More »

Cézanne and the End of Art

Ordinarily one does not finish a book because it is good. Usually, one tires with the monotony of its language and casts it mightily aside. This is not the case with Donald Kuspit’s The End of Art. I am taking a break from it because it is too good, it scares me. The book is brilliant and intense and to …

Read More »