Tag Archives: editorial

Editorial – Volume 35 no 2 November- December 2019

Pendery Weekes, Derek Guthrie, Daniel Nanavati Finally, with the publication of our November/December issue we’ve nearly reached the end of 2020, an ill-fated and turbulent year. It’s been a year that has kept us riveted to the news with its constant updates and restrictions being imposed, lifted and re-imposed in countries all over the world. It has been challenging to …

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Volume 35 no 1 September / October 2020: Editorial – When Politics and Sculpture Collide

Margaret Lanterman Art as political and social comment has a very long and effective history, but the artist’s intent and the message of the work has often been abused for political ends. This repurposing can happen well before the art is installed, or long after. Public sculpture monuments are not a simple thing to discuss because they are seldom just …

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Editorial – Volume 34 no 5 May / June 2020

By Pendery Weekes This issue of the New Art Examiner is unique. Nearly all of us around the world have been under some form of lock-down. Some of us have been confined to our homes, others are allowed to go out for essential food shopping, to pick up medicines at the pharmacy, or to do exercise once a day, others …

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Editorial: Volume 34 no 3 January – February 2020

Jeff Koons is not a name to toy with. When he was asked to create a memorial to the victims of terrorism in Paris one may assume the French authorities had lost their minds asking an aesthetic dedicated to Disneyfying the cities of America, to suddenly find the soulfulness of tragedy within humanity and make it tangible. Perhaps they mistook Koons …

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Editorial

I was invited to a talk given by Rafael Lorenzo-Hemmer at the Hirshhorn Museum who are exhibiting three of his heart-beat installations. His talk, given at 7pm in the cinema-like auditorium, was an object lesson in complacency. Rafael has, as with other contemporary super-stars, a small full time industrial team of fifteen working on his ideas and when he said …

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Editorial

Washington October 30th 2018 I was invited to a talk given by Rafael Lorenzo-Hemmer at the Hirshhorn Museum who are exhibiting three of his heart-beat installations. His talk, given at 7pm in the cinema-like auditorium, was an object lesson in complacency. Rafael has, as with other contemporary super-stars, a small full time industrial team of fifteen working on his ideas …

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Editorial

The USA is very unhappy. In particular the poor and the near poor who are mostly women and minorities are unhappy. Frustrated. Bordering on angry. The art scene has lost all gusto and art no longer enjoys the support and prestige it had even in recent memory. Social media has utterly changed the cultural landscape. The president is unique in …

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Editorial Volume 33.no.1 September / October 2018

There is an interesting idea that, broadly speaking, may be categorized as the ‘psychology of history’. It suggests that because we are a psychological animal still prone to instinct, we can read human history purely from the psychological viewpoint to arrive at a better understanding of why the things that happen, happen. To give you the usual example: our leaders …

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Editorial Volume 32 no. 5 May June 2018

I write from Washington DC as the New Art Examiner opens a new chapter in the most powerful city in the world. Unlike most capital cities, Washington DC does not have a lively art scene. Political considerations dominate. American politics is in turmoil and the news media every day is breaking news of the deepening political drama. The question is …

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Editorial

As the economy recedes, and as the political crisis deepens, the USA is a land of apprehension. A long way from the post-war boom. That time witnessed the triumph of American abstract art. Art follows the money. Embedded in millennial thinking is the Van Gogh syndrome and also the less spectacular introvert voice of Paul Cezanne, who lays a claim …

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Editorial

Humour can often get a message over more readily than any amount of serious work. Though sensibilities change. Things that were jokes in the 1970s are viewed with disbelief for their sheer political incorrectness today. Conversely, some people look at the horrors of an Hieronymus Bosch with a wry smile so we should not be put off from using humour. …

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Editorial Volume 32 no.2 November/December 2017

The shared symbolic order that defined much of art throughout human history had a lot to do ( some may say everything ) with theology. From Astarte the many breasted fertility goddess of clay, to the Parthenon through to the Sistine Chapel, endless icons and intricate designs in places of worship were the desires of patrons and states and the …

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The Plight of the Image

Susan Sontag wrote in ‘On Photography’, that everything today exists to end in a photograph. John Berger in Ways of Seeing told us that reproduction had reinforced an agreed canon of images and given us the expectation of what we see and its worth before we see it. Giacometti in his thinned out, sculptured busts brought sculpture near to the …

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