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Jeremy Shaw Takes the Julia Stoschek Collection Back to the Future

Christian Hain It’s all very confusing indeed, and I don’t talk about that virus thing, no: even before that started, we were (mildly) shocked by Julia Stoschek’s decision to leave Berlin and take her collection to Düsseldorf, where she’s been operating another space for years. The ensuing media outcry was not limited to the German capital, as every other paper …

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Mierle Laderman Ukeles: ‘Maintenance/ Survival / and its Relation to Freedom’

Mary Fletcher Mierle Laderman Ukeles mentions names familiar from the avant garde of the 1960s – Pollock, Duchamp and Rothko – pointing out that that they didn’t change diapers and that when she had a baby daughter she was suddenly in a world of maintenance, involving both mind-bending boredom and the rediscovery of the world as her baby did. In …

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I Kill Giants

Mary Fletcher This film is about Barbara, a young secondary school attender, constructing an elaborate fantasy that helps her deal with an unbearable situation. We see people trying to help her and some girls being nasty to her in the general odious ways of school bullies. I would have liked to have seen the narrative without having absorbed the inevitable …

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The Subject is the Object, the Legacies of Minimalism

Kathryn Hixson From the Archives: This piece first appeared in the New Art Examiner in May 1991 with Derek Guthrie as Publisher and Howard Yana-Shapiro as Acting Publisher. Kathryn Hixson was a freelance writer living in Chicago contributing to Arts and The Journal of Art. Though American art produced in the 1980s and early 1990s deliberately, and satisfactorily, distanced itself …

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MOCA Toronto + The Trendy Thing

  The Toronto Argonauts are a professional Canadian football team competing in the East Division of the Canadian Football League.  Occasionally in the coming years the team may  simply not play.  Sitting out the clock  without engaging the ball is  an unexpected game strategy. The wind might nudge the ball here and there and thus the Argonauts, taking a page …

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Art Nouveau in Milan

Graziella Colombo   Milan is still a city made of stone and iron, stucco and bronze, stained glass, mosaics and ceramics. It is the Milan of Liberty, the instantly recognisable Art Nouveau style, innovative in the use of materials, which became popular at the beginning of the 20th century. Milan is the result of the inspiration and creativity of architects, …

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An Elegant Stench

Aleksander Hudzik Perhaps one of the most overused and detached from its original meaning is the philosophical adage that states: ‘the limits of my language are the limits of my world’. Let’s risk using this phrase to recapture its meaning in a way that its author, philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein, wouldn’t be happy about. Linguistic difficulties are the everyday struggle of …

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Mix and Match

Margaret Richardson VA Made: ‘Mediation Across Media’ at the Branch Museum of Architecture and Design in Richmond, Virginia (July 17 – September 13, 2020) offers a unique opportunity to realize relationships between divergent media and expand one’s perspective of ‘things’. Co-organized by Howard Risatti and Steven Glass, this ambitious exhibition features works circa 1955-2019, from over 30 artists grouped into …

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Last of the Monster Roster

Margaret Lanterman Theodore (Ted) Halkin (1924-2020) Chicago artist, well-loved husband, father, professor, and friend, died on August 11, 2020 at the age of 96. Ted was associated with the 1950s group of Chicago artists known as the Monster Roster. Like many in this group, he was a WWII veteran and is also considered one of the progenitors of the Hairy …

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Against Racism, Against Sexism, Against Ageism

    In a local comic strip,  a child chastises his shamefaced father for never having done anything to change the name of Toronto’s Dundas street; the father didn’t even known that Dundas was a racist oppressor.  But then,  why pick on Dundas? In the 18th century all British aristocrats were racist oppressors.   As were Japanese aristocrats, and so were  …

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