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Brzeżańska’s Stories from Earth

Agnieszka Brzeżańska’s World National Park is akin to that first moment after waking from an intense dream. Brzeżańska’s collective works—paintings, drawings, collage, some sound and video—suggest a story of earthly, human existence through time. They are stories of mark-making, of record-keeping, of illustrating ideas and dreams and stories, both real and invented. The first room contains a series of works …

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Elkins on Art Criticism

How do we judge art and what is the role of the art critic? This article compares James Elkins’ (2003) views on art criticism, with those of others and my own. I am an amateur collector and a psychologist. James Elkins (2003) claims that art criticism is produced and ignored in equal measure. It is not rooted in any academic …

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Volume 34 no 3 January – February 2020: Letters

Editorial 33.6 Dear Editor, Are you suggesting that American philosophers no longer exist? What about David Abram, philosopher, ecologist and performance artist? Marilyn McCord Adams, who recently died? Owen Flanagan with his work on the philosophy of the mind? David Carrier, American philosopher and also art critic? Have you heard of Professor Michael Slote, professor of ethics? The list of …

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The Abuse of Language in Art

A picture is not worth a thousand words. Nor do actions speak louder than words. Words are actions. To form a word—whether written or spoken—involves muscle, movement and energy. A word is the definition of an action. Words are the most accessible and precious tool that humankind has. Everyone has equal access to them, and can convey them in defense …

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The Seductive Economy: Sex, Mettle and Labor in the Art of Donna Nadeau 

Some lives are lived under such brutal, unrelenting conditions that they are unimaginable to the majority of us, and how a person survives at all can seem incomprehensible. When it is an artist who has endured those circumstances they can provide a foundation for work that realizes art’s fullest potential in fusing creative expression, and the most volatile extremes of human experience. …

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A Fraught Biennial: The Whitney Museum of Some American Art

A month before the 2019 Whitney Biennial had concluded, the museum announced its curators for the 2021 Biennial. That was a well-oiled machine grinding into action, but it snatched any remaining thunder from this year’s Biennial which was already limping to a miserable end after being hijacked by protestors and artists  demonstrating against one of the museum’s board members. Sadly, …

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Volume 34 no.2 November/December 2019

In this issue: Speakeasy with Annie Markovich Lynda Green on appreciating Edward Hopper Jane Addams Allen and Derek Guthrie from Chicago Tribune on Edward Hopper’s legacy Al Jirikowic, Washington D.C. Editor, looking at Edward Hopper Margaret Lanterman and Phillip Barcio review Expo Chicago 2019 The Legacy of Apathy –  a talk  given by Derek Guthrie in Washington D.C. 2019 John …

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Living with Hopper

Edward Hopper has been one of my favourite artists since I started taking an interest in art. Along the wall leading to the cafeteria at school, we had a frieze of Seurat’s pointillist painting, ‘A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte. Queuing for lunch I lazily examined it and, knowing nothing of pointillism, even the term, I …

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Two Exhibits Tied to Tradition

Chicago Tribune: Sunday 3rd December 1972 Jane Addams Allen & Derek Guthrie were the art correspondents for the Chicago Tribune for nearly two years. It was only when one of their articles was pulled from the galleys that Jane suggested they publish themselves and start the New Art Examiner in 1974. Their thirst for freedom of speech is our inheritance. …

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A slight look into Edward Hopper

I think we now have a certain advantage of “time” in respect to our viewing of Edward Hopper’s work. It is how he came into his “own” that I wish to discuss. I am taken by the life of Hopper’s “own”, a “resplendent” throughout his life’s work. Hopper is usually discussed for his take on the lonesome American city or …

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The Legacy of Apathy–Derek Guthrie in DC

The New Art Examiner is difficult to explain, as it does not fit into convenient categories. I refer to our Statement of Purpose, printed in every issue since the first one. These profound words were written by a forgotten hero, Edward Fry, the Curator and Art Historian who defied the Trustees of the Guggenheim Museum in New York. He lost …

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