News

A New Look at Italy

Anna Maria Benedetti Painting in late 19th and early 20th-century Europe isn’t only about the avant-garde! In the second half of the 19th century, the impressionists mastered a revolution by eliminating non-naturalist subjects from painting with their ‘retinal painting’ (Duchamp). They eliminated past and future in time, reducing the present to the moment. Reality was what you saw. The inventio, …

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Laura Knight – A Celebration

Mary Fletcher This exhibition covers Laura Knight’s art from her early studies at Nottingham Art College to her work as a war artist. What a remarkable career she had and what a wide range of work. The book published to accompany the show has further pictures and essays and is edited by Elizabeth Knowles. We can see her colours brighten …

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That Special K.

Christian Hain There are many ways to write a biography, and different reasons for reading one. At the beginning of his comprehensive work on Austrian artist Oskar Kokoschka (1886-1980), Rüdiger Görner, German professor at London University, touches upon the difficulties in painting any ‘true’ portrait in written form, or for that matter a ‘painted’ one. Kokoschka himself admitted that his …

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Volume 35 no 5 May / June 2021

Features: Cleveland, ohio and the industrial artland Darren Jones Continues His Series On Art Scenes Across America State of Art Steven Litt’s Survey of the Ohio Art Scene Amanda D. King In Conversation With Darren Jones A hot take on ohio With Cleveland Newcomer Tizziana Baldenebro Cultural conflicts in the visual arts David Carrier The inward eye Colin Fell Writes …

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Editorial: Volume 35 no 5 May June 2021

I am planting an orchard. I have been ‘given’ a field by a friend and have 13 trees in it from last year and now he has seen it doing so well we have extended the planting to another 40 or so trees. They will be a mixture of old varieties of fruits interspersed with berry bushes and a few …

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Speakeasy : Disneyfying Italian Culture

Each issue, the New Art Examiner will invite a well-known, or not so well-known, art world personality to write a speakeasy essay on a topic of interest. LIVIANA MARTIN was born in Northern Italy and lives in Milan. She has a degree in philosophy and she taught for many years. She is keen on ancient and contemporary art, because she …

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Cultural Conflicts in the Visual Arts

David Carrier What happens when previously separated cultures come in contact? Often, as happened when Europeans invaded the New World from the 16th century, or very recently in the American invasion of Iraq, the militarily stronger culture ruthlessly conquers the weaker one. But frequently, also, the results include international trade. When, starting in 1528, Europeans circumnavigated the globe, they brought …

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The Inward Eye

Colin Fell Daffodils have been much on my mind recently. This is natural enough – we’re in the midst of a glorious Cornish spring, made more glorious by the easing of lockdown. And, with the promptness we’re so privileged to enjoy here, the daffs have already been and gone, their moment of splendour in the grass already over, and where …

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Scott Turri Talks With Artist John Sims

John Sims is like a modern-day quilt-maker who weaves together at times seemingly disparate threads of media and ideas: mathematics, performance, video, music, and text, among other things. His work is layered. Although he often approaches it through a personal lens, from his lived experience navigating the world as a black man, he adroitly addresses issues that emanate outward from …

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Malevich’s Windows to Eternity

Stephen Luecking Popular ideas about the fourth dimension wielded significant influence from two directions on the earliest decades of modern abstraction. The first and most popular direction emerged from burgeoning esoteric beliefs where the fourth dimension served as the habitat for spiritual beings. The second direction resulted from extending spatial relationships in two-and three-dimensions of Euclidean geometry into analogous relationships …

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Street Art, Milan

Loretta Pettinato (Translated by Laura Pettinato) Born in New York in 1972 as a rebellious, provocative movement, street art became a fully-fledged artistic movement thanks to the work of Basquiat and Kit Haring, as well as becoming a worldwide phenomenon that can be found in every city. Along with other cities, Milan recognized how much potential this form of art …

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Women of Art

Loretta Pettinato (Translated by Laura Pettinato) An exhibition called ‘Women of Art. Stories of women from the 1500s to the 1600s’ was due to open on March 2nd 2021 in the Palazzo Reale in Milan, but its inauguration was delayed following the latest lockdown. The end of this exhibition has not been changed and it remains July 25th 2021. In-person …

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Artists’ Union of England

Mary Fletcher   The AUE Union was started in 2014. It now has over 500 members and is aiming to be affiliated to the TUC – Trades Union Congress, whose headquarters are in London. It’s therefore a very new and so far a very small trade union. I recently attended the online AGM (Annual General Meeting), participating in a discussion …

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Chaplin’s Comedy The Kid Turns 100

Scott Winfield Sublett Screenwriter Herman Mankiewicz said of Charlie Chaplin, “If people don’t sit at Chaplin’s feet, he goes out and stands where they’re sitting.” Of course, Mankiewicz might have been a bit envious. He, after all, wrote only one masterpiece, and that one not entirely solo (despite the confabulations of Mank director David Fincher). Sir Charles Spencer Chaplin, meanwhile, …

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In Memoriam – John Link in Art Teaching

We republish this interview of our friend and colleague John Link, who died on May 1st 2021.   John Link, retired Professor of Art, Western Michigan University, painter, and contributor to the New Art Examiner, Interview with Lily Lihting Li Kostrzewa – From Philosophy to Art to Writing: When I was in philosophy, my fellow grad students agreed that we …

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Cleveland, Ohio, and the American Industrial Artland

Darren Jones Cleveland could trademark the metallic gray of its winter skies when the cloud deck merges with phreatic plumes from the fissures of growling steel mills. Such scenes exemplify what remains an extraordinary juncture of nature and human engineering in this city, despite the ravages of the rust belt’s decline. When December casts its pall over Cleveland’s indomitable skyline, …

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