News

Dressing for that Final Journey

Have you ever wondered what you would wear on your last final journey? Though this is fashion at the extreme end, for this important moment nothing should be left out, nor any detail overlooked. Prepare your outfit or others will do it for you, perhaps leaving you slightly unsatisfied, to say the least. As the old joke goes, “Is he …

Read More »

Why Cornwall Sold Out

Being asked to write an article on such a topic is rather like asking a man if he has stopped beating his wife. Cornwall. We have to go back a little. Perhaps as far as the Vikings with whom we were on friendly terms, often fighting on the same side. Jolly Vikings. To the Romans who didn’t quite get here, …

Read More »

Black is flat at Roots and Culture

Gonzalo Reyes Rodriguez and Darryl DeAngelo Terrell’s two person show, currently open at Roots and Culture brings together the work of two very different artists. Terrell’s text pieces act as a striking foil to Rodriguez’s photographic works which explore the legacy of documentary photography drawn from the legacy of the Sandanista National Liberation Front and declassified School of the America’s …

Read More »

Huong Ngo, Reap the Whirlwind at Aspect Ratio (West town)

How are representations of the female body visualized and introduced to the western gaze in colonized southeast Asia? How do these representations sustain the programmes of colonization? How do these representations grant or deny subjectivity to subject of the gaze? And perhaps most importantly, how do we reconsider these women as subjects seeking political agency rather than remain as flattened …

Read More »

Entrepreneurship 407: White Supremacy, Benevolent Institutions, and Shinola

There was great clarity in the post-Civil War Confederate monument. Solid materials erected in a city’s central square to carry an unambiguous message: honor white supremacy and intimidate African Americans. While we celebrate the removal of these granite and bronze statues from plazas around the country, it’s worth considering whether their messages find new, unsettling, and implicit forms in places …

Read More »

Marking the Infinite:

Contemporary Women Artists from Aboriginal Australia   The Phillips Collection: Marking the Infinite, spotlights nine leading Aboriginal Australian women artists: Nonggirrnga Marawili, Wintjiya Napaltjarri, Yukultji Napangati, Angelina Pwerle, Lena Yarinkura, Gulumbu Yunupingu, Nyapanyapa Yunupingu, Carlene West, and Regina Pilawuk Wilson. The artists are from remote Aboriginal communities across Australia, and the subjects of their art are broad, yet each work …

Read More »

The Swamp School

One quarter of Lithuania’s territory consists of swamps and wetlands. These lands represent the ethno-cultural identity of the various regions, and pedagogues have long stressed the relationship between ethnic culture and ecology. It is common in ancient myths to consider water a sacred element for positive spiritual activity, but with potential for evil. In local folklore the devil lives in …

Read More »

Rae Johnson in Toronto, Painting in Canada

Have you ever seen a huge-mongous drawing? Rae Johnson’s paintings, average 48”, appear as pencil drawings writ large. Walk up to one; it introduces itself and shakes your hand as a painting, but it’s a painting that looks like a huge pencil work, or a watercolor. In an era where artists put their shoes on the table and call it …

Read More »

All-consuming Beauty

I was walking past a nail bar, one of the kind you find from the centre of London to provincial market towns, and caught sight of the small-print words ‘Fat Freezing’ on the sign swinging outside. I wondered why this was not strange. I stopped and read the sign. The words that had simultaneously attracted and repelled me were in …

Read More »

Van Gogh in Arles

The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Van Gough in Arles show, which opened to the public in October 18 is both exhilarating and crushingly depressing. What unfolds at the Met is a tragedy of grand dimensions. There has seldom been this show which follows an artist development so intimately on the day to day basis nor one which reveals so clearly …

Read More »

Glenstone Penitentiary

Intensely anticipated by the New York and DC art community, October 4 marked the public opening of the Mitch and Emily Rales’ Foundation’s “Pavilions”. Billing itself as the latest U.S. non-profit museum, it may not qualify as a museum at all. According to the International Council of Museums, a worldwide body of museum professionals a museum is “a non-profit permanent …

Read More »

Bearing Witness, Not Weapons

Jill Gibbon Skypes with our European Editor DN: Thank you very much for talking to the New Art Examiner today. I wanted to know a little bit about your background. When did you first think you were going to be an artist? When did you first decide you wanted to be an artist? JG: Oh, that goes back a really …

Read More »

Speakeasy Volume 33 no 2 November / December 2018

Political Art is not Historical Art. In keeping with his years long tradition of making political oil paintings and lithographs satirizing and glorifying the Trump administration, Brigham Young University adjunct professor Jon McNaughton has produced “Crossing the Swamp”. An oil painting with numerous gliclees and lithographs resulting from it, inspired by the German-American painter Emanuel Leutze’s 1851 painting, Crossing the …

Read More »

Editorial

The USA is very unhappy. In particular the poor and the near poor who are mostly women and minorities are unhappy. Frustrated. Bordering on angry. The art scene has lost all gusto and art no longer enjoys the support and prestige it had even in recent memory. Social media has utterly changed the cultural landscape. The president is unique in …

Read More »