News

Creativity & Art: Three Roads to Surprise by Dr.Margaret A. Boden C.B.E.

Professor Boden’s threefold theory of ‘creative surprise’ provides a frame for understanding how surprise translates to creativity and how creativity relates to the visual arts. She elaborates on the forms of creativity and their cultural relations to traditional fine art, conceptual and computer art. Her discussions on creativity and computers raise questions regarding our knowledge of human creativity, while also …

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Lynette Yiadom-Boakye

Lynette Yiadom-Boakye was born in London (1977) of Ghanaian parents. She attended St Martins School of Art & Design (1996/7)Falmouth Art College (1997-2000)and the Royal Academy Schools (2000-2003). She is represented in several public collections including Tate UK, MoMA New York and Royal Academy UK This show seems to be an attempt to make art history uncanny – to offer us …

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Zombie Politics and Culture in the Age of Casino Capitalism.

Professor Giroux’s enlightening main points are present in the introduction, expanded in each chapter, revisited in each chapter’s final paragraphs, in the conclusion and throughout the text. It is a little like being hit over the head with a hammer. I sense he thinks that is exactly what America needs. I certainly wondered how George W Bush’s fraudulent first election …

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Berlin Art Fair

Berlin Art Fair actually lasts not a week but just five days. It is an event which stretches across the whole of central Berlin with, for instance more than 40 openings on just one evening. It comprises several separate art fairs; the ABC fair itself comprises works from a hundred separate galleries and from 17 different countries. Another complete section …

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Ai Weiwei – Exhibition Royal Academy of Art

Al Weiwei is the darling child and poster artist of the Western Art World. I am not passing comment on his art, just the system. He says, “Everything is Art and everything is political.” We, as sluggish, and self centred Westerners, are quite happy for Al Weiwei to cause trouble for the Chinese government. In so doing we use the …

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Speakeasy

The closure of the degree course in contemporary crafts at Falmouth University was the highest profile closure since the demise of Dartington College of Arts. Crafts and Fine Art were the founding subjects of the Falmouth School of Art which became Falmouth University following the merger and relocation of Dartington. The widespread protests against the closure demonstrated the course’s high …

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Outside the Architecture Biennial

A TALE—AND THOUGHTS–OF TWO HOUSES “A wall pitted by a single air rifle shot.” That was the sentence the Museum of Modern Art received from artist Lawrence Weiner. The interpretation was up to them. They could write it as is, fake the scene it described, or, most straightforward, just shoot the wall. Encountering the works of Sarah FitzSimons and Amanda …

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Chicago Architectural Biennial

BIENNIAL EXPO IS JUST FOR ARCHITECTS; ARTISTS SUPPLY THE PUBLIC’S VOICE.   “The Architects are Coming!”, “The Architects are Coming!” is the rallying cry for the citywide exposition Chicago is hosting now through January 3, 2016. For 96 days, Chicago is the architectural center of the world. It is fitting that this city, the birthplace of the skyscraper and bold …

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In Teaching We Cannot Trust

It is nothing new to say that human beings are pattern makers nor that patterns help us to create the structures within which be build society. The art world is such a structure. It relies upon two very important pillars. I am not going to say one of them is money. There is nothing that doesn’t rely upon money in …

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Hans Ulrich Obrist in Conversation with the Hairy Who

In 2014 Art Review named Hans Ulrich Obrist the most powerful figure in the field, but Obrist, a forty-six-year-old Swiss, seems less to stand atop the art world than to race around, up, over, and through it.” During EXPO Chicago, Obrist was “in conversation with the Hairy Who” who were anticipating the fifty-year anniversary of their first exhibition at the …

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Radiance and Rhythm – Sonia Delaunay

A towering unsung figure in the birth of early modernism, Sonia Delaunay and her husband developed early abstraction to remarkable maturity. Their aesthetic theory of simultaneity made abstraction plausible by focusing on pure colour and structure as the focus when looking at work. For the Delaunays, the early 20th century required new forms to suite the new pallet developed over …

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Last Day at Port Eliot Festival

Three Speakers, One Message I arrived late to the bowling lawn in Port Eliot Estate, one of Cornwall’s large inherited earldoms, due to the lack of professionalism of their press officer. I missed the opening remarks from the Director of the Tate Gallery, Sir Nicholas Serota and introduction from Chris Stephens, Lead Curator, Modern British Art at Tate Britain, presently …

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