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Tag Archives: Daniel Nanavati

Editorial – Volume 35 no 2 November- December 2019

Pendery Weekes, Derek Guthrie, Daniel Nanavati Finally, with the publication of our November/December issue we’ve nearly reached the end of 2020, an ill-fated and turbulent year. It’s been a year that has kept us riveted to the news with its constant updates and restrictions being imposed, lifted and re-imposed in countries all over the world. It has been challenging to …

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Ernest Griset

Daniel Nanavati In July 1877 several obituary notices were published about Ernest Griset. The Publishers Record stated: “Griset was very happy in illustrating the Darwinian change of an animal into a man, and of combining men and animals, something after the manner of Grandville. He was quite French in his manner, though he had lived in England from early boyhood. …

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Volume 35 no 1 September / October 2020

Features: 6 An American Child and the Victorian Radicals – James Cassell 9 Intimate Art – Daniel Nanavati 11 Utah can be the Art Scene of the West – Alexander Stanfield 13 In response to Darren Jones on the Whitney Biennial – Al Jirikowic 15 Chairs, Tables and Sex – Frances Oliver 16 Defund the Police, Refund the Arts – …

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Intimate Art

by Daniel Nanavati Let’s talk sex in the art world. Not the male predilection for the female body, from painting to having sex with models, but as a bona fide trade that defies our society’s efforts to create a meritocracy. I thought of this piece when reading Mary Fletcher’s Speakeasy, which appears in this issue, realising that she had not …

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No art superstars from Israel

Given the chance to visit the Tel Aviv Museum of Art and to consider the work and place of contemporary Israeli artists, my mind was filled with expectation. Surely the people who had produced Camille Pisarro and Marc Chagall, rumours about Rembrandt’s Jewish ancestry, Mark Rothko, Amedeo Modigliani, Leon Golub, Naum Gabo, Lucian Freud, Sonia Delaunay and so many others, …

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Volume 34 no 3 January – February 2020

Articles: The Art of Extinction Rebellion: Josephine Gardiner from the UK Rebellion in Hong Kong Art: Leung Suk Ching I Left my Heart in Leipzig: Viktor Witkowski, USA If it Works, don’t Fix it: Frances OIiver, UK Fervid Art from the Edge: Jane Addams Allen, New York Scouting the Blogs: Miklos Legrady, Toronto Brzezanska ‘s Stories from Earth: Katie Zazenski, …

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All We Have Lost

“I think the nice thing about Biennale Arts, it happens every two years, it’s like a clock and I like the idea that it is a way of taking the pulse of what’s happening in art but also in the world.” Ralph Rugoff, Curator of ‘May You Live in Interesting Times’, the title of the 58th Venice Biennale in 2019 …

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Editorial

I was invited to a talk given by Rafael Lorenzo-Hemmer at the Hirshhorn Museum who are exhibiting three of his heart-beat installations. His talk, given at 7pm in the cinema-like auditorium, was an object lesson in complacency. Rafael has, as with other contemporary super-stars, a small full time industrial team of fifteen working on his ideas and when he said …

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Pulitzer comedian at the Hirshhorn

The Hirshhorn hosted an interview between Jerry Saltz, critic at New York magazine and Charlotte Burns editor at In Other Words on the evening of 29th November 2018. It was the second talk I had attended since arriving in DC on 26th September, the first being given by Raphael Lozano-Hemmer. Both were self-indulgent hogwash. Saltz is a stand up comedian. …

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Basel, Miami Beach

Art Basel, Miami Beach is, supremely, a market-place. You walk into the exhibition halls at Untitled, Scope and the Miami Convention Center, and walk around the spaces with your list, knowing exactly what you want to buy. Like any instinctive shopper you are always open to a new experience but in the main your meal will be what you anticipated …

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Publishing Critical Thinking in Cornwall

Some of the finest minds in modern history have edited journals, magazines, books or periodicals. They have enriched the cultural legacy of their generations with their virtuosity, fearless opinion and wide-ranging critiques of their generations. It is not a skill I began to develop until I met Derek Guthrie in Penzance, Cornwall and was presented with the opportunity of resurrecting …

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