Tag Archives: Volume 33 no 3 January / February 2019

Pulitzer comedian at the Hirshhorn

The Hirshhorn hosted an interview between Jerry Saltz, critic at New York magazine and Charlotte Burns editor at In Other Words on the evening of 29th November 2018. It was the second talk I had attended since arriving in DC on 26th September, the first being given by Raphael Lozano-Hemmer. Both were self-indulgent hogwash. Saltz is a stand up comedian. …

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Vanishing into infinity

Yayoi Kusama at the Hirshhorn. Standing alone, surrounded by a cosmos of points of light, or rows of glistening, golden pumpkins, my loneliness is alleviated by the unaccountable vastness and brilliance of these shimmering forms. But there is a dark side to this brilliance; the artist’s suffering and experience played out on this field. Yoyoi Kusama, a very private artist, …

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Same ol’ Carnegie

It was made clear in curator Ingrid Schaffner’s introductory meet the press talk when she posed the rhetorical question to herself; is there a theme for the Carnegie International? Her emphatic response … NO. In general the exhibition is arranged as a series of one person exhibitions which only reinforces the idea that there is not an overarching theme to …

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The Auto Mall of Art

Used car salesmen and all their entourage of overhyped and bibulous aficionados filled the rows of the new and alluring showroom of Art Basel Miami inside the Miami Beach Convention Center. Booth after booth of this year’s freshest art pieces were surrounded by elegant but weathered dealers and artists trying to make it big. Miami Beach tries to pull it …

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Basel, Miami Beach

Art Basel, Miami Beach is, supremely, a market-place. You walk into the exhibition halls at Untitled, Scope and the Miami Convention Center, and walk around the spaces with your list, knowing exactly what you want to buy. Like any instinctive shopper you are always open to a new experience but in the main your meal will be what you anticipated …

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Colour me impressed

The exhibition of the British artist Patrick Heron, which covered his early figurative and later complete abstractions, featured fascinating vignettes of his life. The first retrospective show of Heron’s work in over twenty years, highlights Heron as a driving influence behind the St Ives School. As a critic, Heron made commanding arguments for abstraction, pushing the boundaries of what art …

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The Market Rules but it’s not Okay

In our high tech and cyberspace age a few old metaphors remain, from the time when work was mostly physical; metaphors still current in my childhood but now rare. You might still put a shoulder to the wheel, a nose to the grindstone, or die in harness. You might also be told there are lots of fish in the sea …

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Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

SUMMARY: In this, the centenary of the birth of architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, the attacks continue on the modernist functionalism that he espoused and the glass-and-steel building designs that expressed his vision. Though times have changed, and along with them the needs of architecture, a current New York exhibition of his drawings offers the chance to see Mies …

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Publishing Critical Thinking in Cornwall

Some of the finest minds in modern history have edited journals, magazines, books or periodicals. They have enriched the cultural legacy of their generations with their virtuosity, fearless opinion and wide-ranging critiques of their generations. It is not a skill I began to develop until I met Derek Guthrie in Penzance, Cornwall and was presented with the opportunity of resurrecting …

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Why I Write for the New Art Examiner

Stephen Lee My title, and therefore in effect my brief was proposed by the editors of NAE. My response is to paraphrase George Orwell’s essay on this subject, ‘Why I Write’ (1947). It involves autobiographical accounts followed by a politics of writing – a useful model and a place to begin. Orwell cites four motivations for a writer: sheer egoism …

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Surveillance, Community, The Future of Art

Nancy Schreiber considers Rafael Lozano-Hemmer Pulse Spiral, 2008, Montreal Immediately inside the L’Musee d’ art Contemporain in Montreal was a dazzling display of light, blinking on and off to an irregular rhythm. This inverted, seemingly never-ending Christmas tree of light drew me in to absorb the multitudinous crystalline structure; the tiny lights expanding to the greater. The Smithsonian Hirshhorn Museum …

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The Unprivate Eye

When you are climbing the snail stair of the Reading Room in British Museum you know something different is about to happen. There is nothing more thrilling than discovering ‘the freedom of speech and expression’ alive and well; there is nothing more exciting than the breaking of rules and conventionalism of societies and the smart slight of mind that circumvents …

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Musical Chairs game at New York Art Shows

It’s been an interesting couple of weeks in the New York Art World, as the Armory Show moves to Pier 90 and 94, cancelling Emerging Artist show Volta. Due to the unsound structure of Pier 92 on New York’s Hudson River, part of the Armory show previously to be located on Pier 92, was scheduled to move to nearby Pier …

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Rebellion is neutered when it becomes art

The Citi exhibition. I Object!: Ian Hislop’s search for dissent British Museum room 35 until 20 January 2019 Satire in art is familiar to us all: Hogarth, Daumier, Gillray or, perhaps, Rabelais spring to mind. Their work using humour, irony or exaggeration to expose and criticize. They ridiculed the stupidity, pomposity, vices, follies or abuses of individuals, companies, rulers or …

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