Tag Archives: Volume 34 no 3 January – February 2020:

In Search of a Visual Reward

Writing about art is an art in itself. I join in with the cliché, ‘I don’t know much about art but I know what I like.’ For years I assumed that it’s in the seeing that believing comes. Now I feel it’s become the other way round, as in religion where believing affects the seeing, perhaps. The media critics are …

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Raphael in Milan

Five hundred years ago on Good Friday, 6 April 1520, Raffaello Sanzio, known as Raphael, died in Rome, leaving the world in sorrow. This year Italy celebrates this great painter and architect, master of beauty and perfection. Raphael, son of the court painter Giovanni Santi, was born and trained in Urbino, a small, picturesque town in central Italy. Italy then …

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Brueghal the Elder: the family man

This exhibition is fortunate in its location: the 19th-century italianate Palacio de Gaviria, which is at heart of the old Austrias neighbourhood in Madrid – the most historic part of the city, close to the famous Puerta del Sol and Plaza Mayor squares. I’m mentioning these surroundings because I think in the visual experience of art they are as important …

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Editorial: Volume 34 no 3 January – February 2020

Jeff Koons is not a name to toy with. When he was asked to create a memorial to the victims of terrorism in Paris one may assume the French authorities had lost their minds asking an aesthetic dedicated to Disneyfying the cities of America, to suddenly find the soulfulness of tragedy within humanity and make it tangible. Perhaps they mistook Koons …

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Speakeasy

Each issue the New Art Examiner will invite a well-known, or not so well-known, art world personality to write a speakeasy essay on a topic of interest. Richard Siegesmund is Professor of Art and Design Education at the School of Art, Northern Illinois University. He has served as a Fulbright Scholar to the National College of Art and Design, Dublin, …

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The Art of Extinction Rebellion

On August 11, 2019, on Porthmeor beach, St Ives, Cornwall, crowds of holidaymakers are doing what holidaymakers have always done on blue and sunny Sundays at the peak of the season. Unannounced and seemingly out of nowhere, lines of bizarre silent figures appear, each swathed from head to foot in flowing red draperies, their faces deathly pale, movements slow and …

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Fervid Art from Life on the Edge (1986)

SUMMARY: The Museum of Modern Art’s “Berlinart: 1961-1987” is marred both by serious omissions and the inclusion of too many artists. Nevertheless, the show is important and worth seeing because the art produced in that unique city reflects the role of political, social and cultural issues in the development of art in the 20th century. The moment you enter it, …

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Scouting the Blogs with Miklos Legrady

I’m Hyperallergic to Francis Bacon. I never thought highly of Bacon, a one-trick pony who could have gone so much  further. This painting doesn’t differ that much from his other work. It has the shading and transparency of Bacon’s style, is equally unpleasant, yet looser because incomplete.  Bacon didn’t like it, so he gave the canvas to a painter friend …

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Giorgio de Chirico

Among the many Italian artists who lived in the past century, the painter Giorgio de Chirico was undoubtedly one who always managed to stir up emotions and astonishment, as well as much criticism. In order to celebrate this 20th-century master, Palazzo Reale organized a retrospective exhibition which includes hundreds of artworks, including juvenile paintings, portraits and mannequins, all displayed in …

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Protected by Alarms

Lesley Hale, who is involved with the project to invest in community housing in the building that is being used for this show, had the very bright idea of suggesting it to Joseph Clarke of Anima Mundi. He has taken the opportunity to show 19 of his stable of artists in this alternative place, a dilapidated building. Lesley has largely …

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White House Painter

REACH is the name of a $250m expansion to the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts that opened in Washington, D.C. in September 2019. Sprawling south from the stately main hall is a new campus focused around a series of minimal concrete pavilions that appear discrete at first but are connected underground. The director calls the project “our …

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Truman Capote

Truman Capote has long been one of my most revered writers, so when we popped into a book shop in Chapel Street, Penzance and there, face on, in the middle of a display shelf, was Truman Capote’s book, Answered Prayers, I hesitated but moments. Answered Prayers is not a novel, it is three random chapters of a novel for which he …

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Brzeżańska’s Stories from Earth

Agnieszka Brzeżańska’s World National Park is akin to that first moment after waking from an intense dream. Brzeżańska’s collective works—paintings, drawings, collage, some sound and video—suggest a story of earthly, human existence through time. They are stories of mark-making, of record-keeping, of illustrating ideas and dreams and stories, both real and invented. The first room contains a series of works …

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Elkins on Art Criticism

How do we judge art and what is the role of the art critic? This article compares James Elkins’ (2003) views on art criticism, with those of others and my own. I am an amateur collector and a psychologist. James Elkins (2003) claims that art criticism is produced and ignored in equal measure. It is not rooted in any academic …

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