Home » Tag Archives: Volume 34 no 3 January – February 2020:

Tag Archives: Volume 34 no 3 January – February 2020:

In Search of a Visual Reward

Writing about art is an art in itself. I join in with the cliché, ‘I don’t know much about art but I know what I like.’ For years I assumed that it’s in the seeing that believing comes. Now I feel it’s become the other way round, as in religion where believing affects the seeing, perhaps. The media critics are …

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Raphael in Milan

Five hundred years ago on Good Friday, 6 April 1520, Raffaello Sanzio, known as Raphael, died in Rome, leaving the world in sorrow. This year Italy celebrates this great painter and architect, master of beauty and perfection. Raphael, son of the court painter Giovanni Santi, was born and trained in Urbino, a small, picturesque town in central Italy. Italy then …

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Brueghal the Elder: the family man

This exhibition is fortunate in its location: the 19th-century italianate Palacio de Gaviria, which is at heart of the old Austrias neighbourhood in Madrid – the most historic part of the city, close to the famous Puerta del Sol and Plaza Mayor squares. I’m mentioning these surroundings because I think in the visual experience of art they are as important …

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Speakeasy

Each issue the New Art Examiner will invite a well-known, or not so well-known, art world personality to write a speakeasy essay on a topic of interest. Richard Siegesmund is Professor of Art and Design Education at the School of Art, Northern Illinois University. He has served as a Fulbright Scholar to the National College of Art and Design, Dublin, …

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The Art of Extinction Rebellion

On August 11, 2019, on Porthmeor beach, St Ives, Cornwall, crowds of holidaymakers are doing what holidaymakers have always done on blue and sunny Sundays at the peak of the season. Unannounced and seemingly out of nowhere, lines of bizarre silent figures appear, each swathed from head to foot in flowing red draperies, their faces deathly pale, movements slow and …

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Rebellion in Hong Kong Art – 不可抗力 – 香港刺點畫廊

Ho Siu Nam exhibited his latest photography series “The White of the Tree” (2018). The work records the face of the super typhoon Mangkhut that hit Hong Kong the same year. The strongest tropical cyclone since the 1980s caused extensive damage to Hong Kong. Thousands of tree branches broke and were uprooted. The artist captured the body and wounds of …

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Fervid Art from Life on the Edge (1986)

SUMMARY: The Museum of Modern Art’s “Berlinart: 1961-1987” is marred both by serious omissions and the inclusion of too many artists. Nevertheless, the show is important and worth seeing because the art produced in that unique city reflects the role of political, social and cultural issues in the development of art in the 20th century. The moment you enter it, …

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Scouting the Blogs with Miklos Legrady

I’m Hyperallergic to Francis Bacon. I never thought highly of Bacon, a one-trick pony who could have gone so much  further. This painting doesn’t differ that much from his other work. It has the shading and transparency of Bacon’s style, is equally unpleasant, yet looser because incomplete.  Bacon didn’t like it, so he gave the canvas to a painter friend …

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Giorgio de Chirico

Among the many Italian artists who lived in the past century, the painter Giorgio de Chirico was undoubtedly one who always managed to stir up emotions and astonishment, as well as much criticism. In order to celebrate this 20th-century master, Palazzo Reale organized a retrospective exhibition which includes hundreds of artworks, including juvenile paintings, portraits and mannequins, all displayed in …

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