Tag Archives: Volume 35 no 2 November / December 2020

The Subject is the Object, the Legacies of Minimalism

Kathryn Hixson From the Archives: This piece first appeared in the New Art Examiner in May 1991 with Derek Guthrie as Publisher and Howard Yana-Shapiro as Acting Publisher. Kathryn Hixson was a freelance writer living in Chicago contributing to Arts and The Journal of Art. Though American art produced in the 1980s and early 1990s deliberately, and satisfactorily, distanced itself …

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MOCA Toronto + The Trendy Thing

  The Toronto Argonauts are a Canadian football team competing in the East Division of the Canadian Football League.  Occasionally in the coming years the team may  simply not play.  Sitting out the clock  without engaging the ball is  an unexpected game strategy. The wind might nudge the ball here and there and thus the Argonauts, taking a page from …

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Art Nouveau in Milan

Graziella Colombo   Milan is still a city made of stone and iron, stucco and bronze, stained glass, mosaics and ceramics. It is the Milan of Liberty, the instantly recognisable Art Nouveau style, innovative in the use of materials, which became popular at the beginning of the 20th century. Milan is the result of the inspiration and creativity of architects, …

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The Wounds of History

Liviana Martin   Città di Castello, a town in the province of Perugia, has one of the largest collections of works by Alberto Burri (1915-1995). With its vast rooms, Palazzo Albizzini houses 129 works by this maestro of informal art and tireless experimenter who was capable of giving nobility and artistic form to the poorest materials. It was Burri himself …

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An Elegant Stench

Aleksander Hudzik Perhaps one of the most overused and detached from its original meaning is the philosophical adage that states: ‘the limits of my language are the limits of my world’. Let’s risk using this phrase to recapture its meaning in a way that its author, philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein, wouldn’t be happy about. Linguistic difficulties are the everyday struggle of …

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Ernest Griset

Daniel Nanavati In July 1877 several obituary notices were published about Ernest Griset. The Publishers Record stated: “Griset was very happy in illustrating the Darwinian change of an animal into a man, and of combining men and animals, something after the manner of Grandville. He was quite French in his manner, though he had lived in England from early boyhood. …

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BOOK REVIEW – Ludwig Bemelmans

Frances Oliver The Covid lockdown has sent me back to old favourite books, and I have just revisited two by Ludwig Bemelmans, one from my parents’ art book collection, My Life in Art, and a battered autobiography, Life Class, from mine. Ludwig Bemelmans (1898–1962), born Austro-Hungarian, later American, was a writer and painter renowned chiefly for his children’s books. The …

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