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To The Ends of the Earth

Pedro Correa #5

Forest green painted walls are lined by white negative space. The color green is associated with life, harmony, and energy. An explanatory introduction and one thoughtful quote are also painted, but in white. I have an idea of what is to come next.
A line of spotlights trail overhead, illuminating every wall, including the entryway, reminding me of the sun’s rays. Eastman and Reda’s photographs are traditionally framed in wood and nailed to the walls; Correa’s photographs are placed in glass, supported by a metal back, either drilled or nailed.
Each connects to the overarching theme of nature. Reda’s archival print photography focuses on natural landscapes, Correa’s diasec finish prints hone in on natural colors, lines, and urban spaces, while Eastman’s photographic film print create a flow of natural movement of bodies with nature.
Reda sends me traveling to see some of the coldest peninsulas, warmest skies, and rockiest mountains, feeling all the seasons in one.
I feel an urge to move as free as each subject in the blurred stills of Eastman’s. I become a dancing performance piece of “Natural Dance.” I am at play aside a pond of lotuses and bright winged birds; or among lush, green countryside with a large tree on a hill; swaying in rhythm of the breeze.
Correa’s last scene, #5 is a fitting finale. A tall, wide building stands in front of the car I ride in, the rain separating the man-made bodies. I peer through the window, while stuck inside, and see the city. The foggy windows have traces of my fingers sliding down the glass racing the raindrops in parallel lines and circles. A bright gaudy yellow light burns – Heaven burning inside me. Heaven is childhood and I find comfort in that.
Prices range from $255 to $10,200.
“To the Ends of the Earth” at the Workhouse Arts Center Museum (Lorton, VA) March 10 – May 13.

Hayley Harris

Volume 32 no 6 July/August 2018 p 27

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Ben Campbell

Hi Hayley,
Could you possibly elaborate on what you wrote here: “Heaven burning inside me. Heaven is childhood and I find comfort in that.” The phrase has been ringing in my ears ever since I read it.
I was also wondering why the prices go from $255 to $10,200, such a big price difference!

Hayley Harris

Hello Ben,
The meaning of the quoted sentences you included, to sum it up, is call on nostalgia of my childhood – a wonderful time in my life connected to an unmatched heart-warming feeling.
Also, the prices of all the pieces of the exhibit range between those two price points.

Ben Campbell

Thank you Hayley for the evocative explanation linking to your childhood.

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